Focus Areas

Focus areas are intended to guide students to courses that will meet their interests and career goals. Students are not required to complete a focus area, and focus areas are not listed on transcripts or degrees. If desired, students may elect to complete one or more focus area. This decision should be made in consultation with the student's advisor.

SLIS Online

Academic librarians manage information resources and meet the information needs of faculty and students at post–secondary educational institutions, including community colleges, four-year colleges and universities, and medical and law school libraries. A career in academic librarianship offers numerous opportunities to specialize in diverse areas such as reference or instruction. Individuals may also pursue careers as metadata librarians, electronic resources librarians, distance learning librarians, or systems librarians.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Academic Librarianship webpage.

Adult services librarians meet the educational, informational, and recreational needs of adults throughout their life span.  They develop collections and provide programming and reference services on topics such as career development, small business ownership, parenting, investing, retirement, and estate planning. They provide reader's advisory services, informational and digital literacy instruction, and outreach services to homebound seniors and those in managed care facilities.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Adult Services in Public Libraries webpage.

Professionals working in cultural heritage institutions such as archives, libraries, and museums utilize electronic information technologies such as digitization and linked data to manage, preserve, and provide access to their diverse collections. These collections include print materials, digital materials, and physical artifacts. Activities include the creation of data/metadata to describe and provide access, categorization and classification, and the preservation and curation of both digital and physical materials.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Cultural Heritage Resource Management webpage.

Digital content managers collect, organize, and evaluate digital assets regardless of their types, formats or methods of delivery. They manage the life cycle of digital content from creation to curation, build applications (such as Websites, databases, information retrieval systems) and develop services (such as digital libraries and digital curation) that respond to institutional and individual user needs. A wide range of information-rich institutions, including corporations, government agencies and information centers, require digital content management services.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Digital Content Management webpage.

This focus area trains and supports information professionals working in non-traditional environments, such as knowledge management and competitive intelligence. It focuses on the nature and characteristics of tacit and explicit knowledge, information behaviors in organizational settings, and strategies to capture, identify, codify, organize, store, share, use and reuse various information and knowledge assets in organizations. The focus area is designed for students who seek careers such as knowledge manager, knowledge engineer/strategist, competitive intelligence analyst/manager, or information/knowledge specialist.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Knowledge Management webpage.

This focus area prepares students for positions as adult services librarians, teen librarians, and children’s librarians in public libraries and is especially appropriate for librarians in small rural libraries and smaller branches of larger library systems. Such librarians meet the educational, informational, and recreational needs of patrons at every stage of life. They develop collections and programming, including lapsit, toddler, and pre-school storytimes, and summer reading programs for children and teens, and on topics such as career development, small business ownership, parenting, investing, retirement, and estate planning for adults. They provide readers’ advisory services, early literacy skills training, informational and digital literacy instruction, homework help, and outreach services to homebound seniors and those in managed care facilities.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Public Librarianship webpage.

School librarians work in public or private elementary, middle, and high school libraries, where they develop collections which support the curriculum, collaborate with teachers to integrate reading into the classroom, and provide information literacy and reference services to students.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the School Librarianship webpage.

Youth services librarians work in public libraries as children's librarians, where they meet the educational, informational, and recreational needs of children from birth through age 12, or as teen (young adult) librarians, meeting the needs of teens from 12 to 18. Some libraries include tween librarians, who work with ages 11-14 (middle-school age). They develop collections and programming, including lapsit, toddler, and pre-school storytimes, summer reading programs, and special events programming. They provide readers’ advisory services, early literacy skills training, informational and digital literacy instruction, and homework help. They often manage their own departments and staff, as well as their own collections and budgets.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Youth Services Librarianship webpage.

 

LSU Online

Archivists maintain the integrity of the historical record. Archivists fulfill this mission through the essential roles and duties beginning with determining which records possess enduring value. The archivist actively preserves and protects the selected records from deterioration, damage, and destruction, and provides access to these historical records for use in research. Finally, the archivist brings history to the people through the development of exhibitions, digital collections, workshops, and educational programming.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Archival Studies webpage.

Professionals working in cultural heritage institutions such as archives, libraries, and museums utilize electronic information technologies such as digitization and linked data to manage, preserve, and provide access to their diverse collections. These collections include print materials, digital materials, and physical artifacts. Activities include the creation of data/metadata to describe and provide access, categorization and classification, and the preservation and curation of both digital and physical materials. 

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Cultural Heritage Resource Management webpage.

This focus area prepares students for a range of positions including those in public and academic libraries. Public librarians meet the educational, informational, and recreational needs of patrons at every stage of life and develop collections and programming. Academic librarians manage information resources and meet the information needs of faculty and students at post–secondary educational institutions, including community colleges, four-year colleges and universities, and medical and law school libraries. Students in the librarianship focus area complete the foundational courses for academic librarianship, adult services in public libraries, and youth services librarianship. 

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Librarianship webpage.

Records and information managers are responsible for accurately, securely, and effectively managing information received and produced by a wide range of public and private sector organizations. The focus area prepares students for positions such as Records and Information Management Officer, Information Governance Officer, Digital Assets Manager, or Enterprise Content Manager in areas such as government and municipal offices, healthcare, legal services, financial services, insurance services, the oil and gas industry, and education.

Learn more about this Focus Area by visiting the Records and Information Management webpage.